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Dan D Lyon

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About Dan D Lyon

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  1. Thank you gentlemen. I downloaded a trial version of fm10 and the script trigger (onRecordLoad) feature solves my issue nicely. Upgrading soon. I wish the new UI could toggle to the old style side menu ... now I have to redesign my layouts to fit the window so as not to have to scroll so much... oh well. Thanks again also for all the other ideas and info to study.
  2. Each case type has this Side Panel calculation field, but with a different equation to determine its required size. My apologies for not being more precise, I'll try again... All type cases have the same 4 input number fields (height, width, depth and cover thickness). The specific calculation fields for each case type cut sheet are are in a specific layout for each case type. When stepping through the records while in a 1/2 inch cover type case layout and the next record is intended as a 1/4 inch rack type case, this displays erroneous results. Each record must only be
  3. Thanks for these interesting ideas.... more to digest....... I'll be back...
  4. I should mention that tables are new to me. The prior version of Filemaker I had was 3, no tables then. An example of one of the many calculation fields that are subtly different for each case type: (text result) Side Panels = Width & " x *" & Let([ integer=Int(Evaluate ( Substitute ( Height ; " " ; "+" ) ) - .3125) ; numerator=Mod(Evaluate ( Substitute ( Height ; " " ; "+" ) ) - .3125 ;1)]; Case(integer;integer &" ";"")& Case(Int(numerator*64) < 1;""; Mod(Int(numerator*64);32) = 0; "1/2"; Mod(Int(numerator*64);16) = 0;Div(
  5. "A table is a collection of records - basically a shoebox with cards. A file is a collection of one or more tables. A solution is a collection of one or more files." This sounds like option 1. -- A file for each of 8 case types. "I still don't understand the main issue here: suppose you have a table of Cases, with fields for: • Height • Width • Depth • CoverHeight • CaseType (one of 8 possible types) What additional attributes (i.e. fields) are necessary to describe an individual case?" All the calculation fields that are unique to each case type that con
  6. I appreciate your help, thanks for bearing with me. Hopefully I'll get my needs across more clearly and understand your recommendations better... The most important part of this database is to be able to enter the dimensions for a specific type of case, plus the cover height; for instance: 24" high x 30" wide x 16" deep and the cover 4" high. Then with many calculation fields create a cut sheet layout with the many size parts needed... and also calculate materials costs with labor for pricing each custom case. As I said, there are 8 different types of cases (and which I wasn't s
  7. Okay, I'm getting it. Use tables as sub categories, not as types, right?
  8. I neglected to say that each job would be a record, and the records would be grouped by case type. So are you saying under these circumstances, having each case type group, could be separate tables?
  9. This makes sense to me, I'm just learning the table concept and trying to adapt from HyperCard, which is quite different. The reason for this question was to try and emulate the HyperCard archival aspect of having a "card", like a snapshot, for each job. I'll go back to studying FileMaker and tables and not try to emulate HyperCard functionality. : Thanks much.
  10. I work for a company that makes road/flight cases. Almost 20 years ago I wrote some software using Macintosh HyperCard running on Mac OS 8.6. You enter the 3 dimensions in inches plus the cover height and it calculates a cut sheet, materials and labor pricing. Time is long past to remake this application run on our new computers (before our old macs become extinct out from under us), and FileMaker seems to be the platform to retool to. My question is how to adapt the Hypercard concept into a FileMaker world. In Hypercard there is a stack for each of 8 different case types we make.
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