Jump to content

open files with password


pepe

This topic is 8694 days old. Please don't post here. Open a new topic instead.

Recommended Posts

  • Newbies

I would like to execute a FM3 file with password from the Task Scheduler so that it does not ask me the password each time it starts and runs it automatically.

I thank you in advance for your quick reply and remain,

With best regards,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by pepe:

I would like to execute a FM3 file with password from the Task Scheduler so that it does not ask me the password each time it starts and runs it automatically.

I thank you in advance for your quick reply and remain,

With best regards,

There are two ways to open a file with a "default" password. I'm not sure which one will work best for you, but it might be a combination of both of them.

The first and easiest is to set up a default password in the Document Preferences. Go to the Edit menu and choose "Document". Click the check box for "Try default password" and enter the password into the text field that becomes available. When the file opens, it will try this password first.

To override this password, hold down the option key on Mac and Shift key on Windows when the file opens. You'll be presented with the normal password dialog box and can enter a different password.

The other way to open a file with a password without having to enter it is in a script. If you are in a file that has the same password as the one you want to get into, using the Open script step or the Perform Script script step on the other file will open that file with the same password as the one you used to get into the file you are in.

Chuck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • Newbies

Pardon my ignorance, but why are you protecting a file with a password and then allowing the computer to automatically enter the password?

Surely it would be easier and no less secure, to remove the password altogether?

That is one element of Filemaker I could never understand...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:

Originally posted by ortenzi:

Pardon my ignorance, but why are you protecting a file with a password and then allowing the computer to automatically enter the password?

Surely it would be easier and no less secure, to remove the password altogether?

That is one element of Filemaker I could never understand...

One could assume that the password automatically entered is one that only allows limited access to the files. Perhaps it does not allow editing or field or access to scriptmaker. Or perhpas it only allows browsing of records. And so on...

This is what the autoentered password is for.

------------------

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Kurt Knippel

Consultant

Database Resources

mailto:[email protected]

http://www.database-resources.com

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The benefit of using an autoenter password if you do it right is that the end user never seeing a system level password that sets their access parameters. It's a lot harder to hack (even accidently) that which you don't see happening.

The easiest way to implement this is to create a login file that get distributed to the end user. You set the default password on this file only system password for their access level, and set it open the appropriate beginning file in your solution, and then to close upon completion. You know have access levels set for this user for this session.

I could go into much more detail on access control, but it would create a lot of reading.

Hope this little bit helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is 8694 days old. Please don't post here. Open a new topic instead.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.